Your Mom Plays a Role in Age at Menopause, Longevity

For women, predicting when they’ll reach menopause is anyone’s guess. But if you want to get some foresight, you should ask your mother.

For most women, menopause begins at around 52. But for thousands of women it starts much later, and for some, a lot earlier. Those whose menopause starts later may also be looking at a longer life expectancy, researchers have found.

Smoking, chemotherapy and weight can affect the age when a woman’s monthly periods stop.

But family history appears to be the most important factor, according to researchers led by Harold Bae, of Oregon State University’s College of Public Health and Human Sciences. If your mother started menopause early, odds are you will, too, the investigators found.

Full story at US News

Heart disease, stroke risk factors may increase in severity before menopause

The severity of key risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke appears to increase more rapidly in the years leading up to menopause, rather than after, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The study also found that this pattern of rapidly increasing risk factors before menopause appears to be more pronounced among African-American women.

The risk factors, together known as metabolic syndrome, include a large waistline, high triglyceride (a blood fat) levels, low HDL (the “good” cholesterol) levels, high blood pressure and high blood sugar when fasting.

Full story of heart disease and stroke before menopause at Science Daily

New model of care for healthy menopause and aging

A new position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society (EMAS) published in the journal Maturitas provides a holistic model of care for healthy menopause.

In the article, the researchers argue that the core team around menopausal womenshould consist of a lead clinician, specialist nurse(s) and the woman herself, supported by an interdisciplinary network of medical experts and providers of alternative/complementary medicine. Lead clinicians should provide specialist expertise that is both comprehensive and integrated for the care of midlife women. The core team should also be responsible for structuring and optimizing processes in primary and secondary care.

As the lifespan of women in developed countries continues to increase, menopause can now be considered to be a midlife event. Although not all women will experience short- or long-term problems related to menopause, the high prevalence of hot flushes and vaginal atrophy, which can last for many years, as well as osteoporosis (1 in 3 women are at risk of an osteoporotic fracture), makes caring for ageing women a key issue for health professionals.

Full story of new model of care for healthy menopause at Science Daily