CPAP Brings Longer Life for Obese People With Sleep Apnea: Study

There’s good news for the millions of obese Americans with sleep apnea: Researchers report the use of the CPAP mask may greatly increase their chances for a longer life.

Use of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask was tied to a 62% decline in the odds for death over 11 years of follow-up.

That benefit held even after factoring in health risk factors such as heart disease, weight, diabetes and high blood pressure, said a French team of investigators led by Dr. Quentin Lisan, of the Paris Cardiovascular Research Center.

Full story at US News

CPAP superior to supplemental oxygen for blood pressure reduction in obstructive sleep apnea

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the most widely prescribed therapy for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, resulted in significantly lower blood pressure compared to either nocturnal supplemental oxygen or an educational control treatment, according to a new study from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH).

The study is published in the June 12, 2014 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

“The effect of CPAP on blood pressure in this study is important for both physicians and their patients,” said Daniel Gottlieb, MD, MPH, lead study author and a physician-scientist in BWH’s Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders. “Previous studies have demonstrated that a decrease in blood pressure of this magnitude is associated with up to a 20 percent reduction in mortality from stroke and a 15 percent reduction in cardiovascular mortality.”

Full story of CPAP for sleep apnea at Science Daily