Senior Divorce: Now What?

AMONG U.S. ADULTS AGES 50 and older, the divorce rate has roughly doubled since the 1990s, according to a Pew Research Center report. What has been called “gray” divorce is often attributed to the fact that people are living longer. But there are other factors at work driving this.

Why the Uptick?

The blessing and curse of a longer life is that many people are re-evaluating. The idea of staying in an unhappy situation for the sake of whomever and whatever is no longer appealing when faced with possibly 30 more years of life. People want to live that life.

There is a reduced stigma in society toward divorce, and baby boomers are no stranger to it. Plus, remarriages tend to not last as long as the first attempt. Among all adults 50 and older who divorced in 2015, 48 percent had been in their second or higher marriage.

Full story at US News

Generation X at greater risk of stroke than baby boomers

Older baby boomers — those born between 1945 and 1954 — can proudly boast a new label: the “stroke-healthiest generation,” according to a Rutgers study that found the lowest incidence of ischemic stroke in this age group within the past 20 years. In contrast, the rate of stroke more than doubled in Generation X, people born between 1965 and 1974, during the same time period. The study was published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“The incidence of stroke has decreased significantly overall since 1950, due to the advancement of medicine,” said Joel N. Swerdel, MS, MPH, lead author of the study conducted at the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey (CVI) at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. “However, we found that trend to be reversing in younger generations where obesity and diabetes are likely causing an increase in cardiovascular disease.”

Full story of generation X and stroke risks at Science Daily

Fighting Prescription Painkiller Abuse Among Baby Boomers

Prescription opioid abuse has reached epidemic proportions, with more than half of patients being treated for chronic pain reportedly misusing their medication at some point.

However, new research led by University at Buffalo psychiatric nursing researcher Yu-Ping Chang found motivational interviewing, a form of behavioral counseling, is an effective tool at curbing the abuse.

Prescription opioids — which includes pain medications such as morphine, Lortab and codeine — are abused by 1.9 million Americans and cause nearly two deaths every hour from overdose or respiratory depression. Nearly 75 percent of opioid addiction patients switch to heroin as a cheaper source of the drug, according to data from the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

Full story of prescription painkiller abuse at Science Daily