He has autism. He’s willing and able to work. Can he find the right fit?

In the past decade, Tom Whalen, a 27-year-old Baltimore County man, has had jobs at an animal shelter, a mailroom, multiple grocery stores, a doggy day-care center and a landscaping company.

He is chatty, outgoing and engaging, quick to win over strangers and ask for opportunities. Then, in short order, he loses them.

“He could get jobs,” says his mother, Sue.

“The problem is maintaining them,” adds his father, Ed.

Full story at The Washington Post

‘Switch’ in Alzheimer’s and stroke patient brains prevents generation and survival of neurons

A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has identified a chemical “switch” that controls both the generation of new neurons from neural stem cells and the survival of existing nerve cells in the brain. The switch that shuts off the signals that promote neuron production and survival is in abundance in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients and stroke victims. The study, published July 3 in Cell Reports, suggests that chemical switch, MEF2, may be a potential therapeutic target to protect against neuronal loss in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and autism.

“We have shown that when nitric oxide (NO) — a highly reactive free radical — reacts with MEF2, MEF2 can no longer bind to and activate the genes that drive neurogenesis and neuronal survival,” said Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., director and professor in the Neuroscience and Aging Research Center at Sanford-Burnham, and a practicing clinical neurologist. “What’s unique here is that a single alteration to MEF2 controls two distinct events — the generation of new neurons and the survival of existing neurons,” added Lipton, who is senior author of the study.

Common links between neurodegenerative diseases identified

The pattern of brain alterations may be similar in several different neurodegenerative diseases, which opens the door to alternative therapeutic strategies to tackle these diseases.

Diseases of the central nervous system are a big burden to society. According to estimates, they cost €800 billion per year in Europe. And for most of them, there is no definitive cure. This is true, for example, for Parkinson disease. Although good treatments exist to manage its symptoms, they become more and more ineffective as the disease progresses. Now, the EU-funded REPLACES project, completed in 2013, which associated scientists with clinicians, has shed light on the abnormal working of a particular brain circuitry related to Parkinson’s disease. The results of the project suggest that these same circuits are implicated in different forms of pathologies. And this gives important insights into the possible common links between neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson and intellective disabilities or autism.

Full story of neurodegenerative disease at Science Daily