New Funding Opportunity for Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer

A new funding opportunity from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) at ACL has been announced for a Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP) Program: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer.

The purpose of the DRRP program is to plan and conduct research, demonstration projects, training, and related activities (including international activities) to develop methods, procedures, and rehabilitation technology that maximize the full inclusion and integration into society, employment, independent living, family support, and economic and social self-sufficiency of individuals with disabilities.

Full story at acl.gov

Webinar: Addressing Social Determinants of Health in Primary Care

Although a growing body of research suggests that social determinants of health—social, functional, environmental, cultural and psychological factors—are intricately linked to health and wellness, our fragmented medical and social services are often underequipped to address these needs. The Ambulatory Integration of the Medical and Social (AIMS) model—developed by the Center for Health and Social Care Integration (CHaSCI) at Rush University Medical Center—integrates masters-prepared social workers into primary care teams to identify, address, and monitor social needs that influence health.

Preliminary evidence indicates that AIMS reduces clients’ emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and readmission rates. AIMS also creates opportunities for community-based organizations (CBO) to develop partnerships with local health clinics to integrate care and promote better health outcomes.

Please join the Aging and Disability Business Institute  on April 24 at 1:00 PM Eastern for a one-hour webinar. This webinar will highlight training and implementation support for CBOs interested in replicating AIMS.

For more on this Webinar, visit acl.gov

New Funding Opportunity for Research on Community Living and Participation of People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

A new funding opportunity from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) at ACL has been announced for an Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) on community living and participation for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The purpose of the RRTC program, which are funded through the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program, is to achieve the goals of, and improve the effectiveness of, services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act through well-designed research, training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities in important topic areas as specified by NIDILRR. These activities are designed to benefit rehabilitation service providers, individuals with disabilities, family members, and other stakeholders.

Full story at acl.gov

Supporting nutrition, Supporting health and independence

We all know that good nutrition is the foundation of good health. Healthy eating can help people achieve and maintain a healthy weight, prevent the onset of chronic diseases, reduce inflammation, and speed recovery from injuries. On the other hand, poor nutrition is connected to a variety of health problems.

Earlier this month, I had lunch with Vice Admiral Jerome Adams, the U.S. Surgeon General. I shared some of the things ACL was working on during National Nutrition Month, and we talked about how important nutrition is for the people ACL serves.

VADM Adams gets it. “People who don’t have enough healthy food are more likely to be hospitalized, tend to experience longer hospital stays, and are more likely to be readmitted after discharge.  Good nutrition is important to everyone, but it is even more critical for those at risk for being food insecure, such as older adults and people with disabilities, many of whom already are already at increased risk of hospitalization.”

Full story at acl.gov

A South Carolina CIL Leads the Way on Employment for Youth with Disabilities

Able South Carolina is a Center for Independent Living (CIL) that has taken a leading role in promoting successful employment outcomes for the state’s youth with disabilities. Reflecting the independent living principle of “nothing about us without us,” 80% of Able SC’s staff are people with disabilities. Their efforts highlight the importance of building broad coalitions and letting people with disabilities lead the way.

In 2016, Able SC became the first Center for Independent Living awarded a Partnerships in Employment (PIE) Systems Change Grant. These five-year grants fund various state agencies and organizations to form consortiums that improve employment outcomes, expand competitive employment in integrated settings, and improve statewide system policies and practices for youth and young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Since 2011, ACL’s Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities has funded PIE grants for 14 state projects.

Full story at acl.gov

American Heart Month

February is American Heart Month . According to the American Heart Association , approximately 85 million adults (greater than 1 in 3) have cardiovascular disease; more than 43 million adults age 60 and older are impacted.  Additionally, about two-thirds of cardiovascular disease-related deaths occur in people age 75 and older.

With support from the Administration for Community Living (ACL), organizations across the country are offering proven programs to help people better manage chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Since 2010, more than 340,000 individuals have participated in chronic disease self-management education (CDSME) and self-management support programs. More than 60% of participants indicate having multiple chronic health conditions, including nearly 42% with hypertension and approximately 15% with heart disease.

Full story at acl.gov

Two Funding Opportunities Open for Traumatic Brain Injury State Partnership Program

ACL’s Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) State Partnership Program is announcing two new funding opportunities.

The purpose of the program is to create and strengthen a system of services and supports that maximizes the independence, well-being, and health of persons with TBI across the lifespan, their families, and their caregivers. The goal is two-fold: to allow states to strengthen and group their capacity to support and maintain a system of services and supports that will help people with TBI; and learn from and call upon the expertise of states that have built and maintained a strong and sophisticated state TBI infrastructure.

TBI State Partnership Program Partner State Grants – These grants will provide funding to states for building and enhancing basic infrastructure of TBI supports and services. Applicants must agree to provide the required 2:1 state match; support a state TBI advisory council; provide at least one dedicated staff person at 50% FTE; create an annual TBI state plan; create and/or expand a state TBI registry; and work with one or more Mentor States to increase the applicant’s capacity to provide access to comprehensive and coordinated services for individuals with TBI and their families.

Full story at acl.gov

New Funding Opportunity for RERC on Technologies to Support Aging-in-Place for People with Long-Term Disabilities

A new grant opportunity from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) at ACL has been announced under the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers (RERC) Program on Technologies to Support Aging-in-Place for People with Long-Term Disabilities.

The purpose of the RERC program is to improve the effectiveness of services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act by conducting advanced engineering research on and development of innovative technologies that are designed to solve particular rehabilitation problems or to remove environmental barriers. RERCs also demonstrate and evaluate such technologies, facilitate service delivery system changes, stimulate the production and distribution of new technologies and equipment in the private sector, and provide training opportunities.

Full story at acl.gov

Funding Opportunities Open for Rehabilitation Research and Training Center Program

The National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) at ACL has announced several funding opportunities for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) Program.

The purpose of the RRTCs (which are funded through the Disability and Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program) is to achieve the goals of, and improve the effectiveness of, services authorized under the Rehabilitation Act through well-designed research, training, technical assistance, and dissemination activities in important topic areas as specified by NIDILRR. These activities are designed to benefit rehabilitation service providers, individuals with disabilities, family members, and other stakeholders.

Full story at ACL.com

ACL awards grant for National Resource Center on Nutrition and Aging Grant to Meals on Wheels America

The Administration for Community Living recently awarded a three-year grant to Meals on Wheels America for continued operation of the National Resource Center on Nutrition and Aging (NRCNA) .

The NRCNA is working to increase the capacity of the aging services network to meet the nutrition services needs of a rapidly growing population of older adults. The Center provides educational opportunities, tools and resources that cover best practices and emerging trends in the fields of nutrition, aging, healthcare integration, and innovative business models. It also works to enhance the aging service network’s knowledge of the role of nutrition services in health promotion and disease prevention, as well as the scientific and clinical evidence that support both healthy meals and other nutrition services.

Full story at ACL.gov