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A new study finds that 1 in 5 people under age 40 now have metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the odds for many serious conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The rate of metabolic syndrome is rising in all age groups — as many as half of adults over 60 have it. But among 20- to 39-year-olds, the rate rose 5 percentage points over five years, the study reported.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of heart disease risk factors that occur together. They include:

  • A large waistline,
  • High blood pressure,
  • Higher-than-normal blood sugar levels,
  • High triglyceride levels (triglycerides are a type of blood fat),
  • Low levels of good (HDL) cholesterol.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

It often seems the older a person gets, the less they sleep, but new research suggests that inconsistent sleep patterns might predict a future diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers who studied 2,930 older men for more than a decade found that those with a particular sleep problem — called circadian rhythm disruptions — were three times more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. A central nervous system disorder, Parkinson’s affects balance and movement, and often causes tremors.

The study findings “can potentially help with the early detection of Parkinson’s in older adults,” said study lead author Yue Leng, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Older men who have a weak or irregular circadian rhythm guiding their daily cycles of rest and activity are more likely to later develop Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study by scientists at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences who analyzed 11 years of data for nearly 3,000 independently living older men.

The scientists said their discovery of the link between circadian rhythms and Parkinson’s — a disease characterized by loss of control over movement, balance and other brain functions — suggests these circadian disruptions may reflect neurodegenerative disease processes already affecting the brain’s internal clock well before a Parkinson’s diagnosis, and that they could be considered an early warning sign of the disease.

“The strength of the circadian rhythm activity seems to have a really important effect on health and disease, particularly in aging. In this latest study we found that even small changes in circadian rhythm in older men were associated with a greater likelihood of getting Parkinson’s down the line,” said study senior author Kristine Yaffe, MD, the Roy and Marie Scola Endowed Chair and vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry at UCSF, a professor of psychiatry, neurology, and epidemiology and biostatistics, and a member of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

When COVID-19 strikes the young, the lion’s share of patients still show symptoms, a new report on a coronavirus outbreak aboard a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier suggests.

In late March, the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Guam after numerous sailors on the ship developed COVID-19. In April, the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated the outbreak by checking the lab findings for 382 service members on the carrier.

In the outbreak, there was widespread transmission of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) among young, healthy adults living in close quarters who mostly showed mild symptoms, the researchers reported June 9 in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a CDC publication.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), representing more than 14,000 nursing homes and assisted living communities across the country that provide care to approximately five million people each year, released the following statement in response to data released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on the number of nursing home residents who have contracted COVID-19 as well as an announcement from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) regarding additional penalties on nursing homes. 

The following statement is attributable to Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of AHCA/NCAL: 

“These numbers show what we have known for months, that COVID-19 disproportionately impacts the elderly with chronic diseases and the dedicated staff who care for them. Today’s report validates the need for the assistance that nursing homes have been calling for since the beginning of this pandemic. Especially as we continue to expand testing for residents and staff in long term care centers in June, we should anticipate the number of cases to rise as asymptomatic residents and staff will be identified.  While an increase in these reported numbers may be startling, it will improve our ability to confront this threat and protect our residents.

Full article at AHCA

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), representing more than 14,000 nursing homes, assisted living communities and other long term care facilities across the country that provide care to approximately five million people each year, released the following statement in response to Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus task force coordinator, and her call for states to prioritize more COVID-19 testing for long term care facilities during her comments in Tuesday’s White House coronavirus briefing. 

The following statement is attributable to Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of AHCA and NCAL.

“According to a Washington Post article this week, ‘one out of 10 nursing homes have publicly reported cases of the coronavirus…with a death count that has spiraled into the thousands.’” 

Full article at the American Health Care Association

Assisted Living Administrator Online CEUs

The CARES Act provides economic impact payments of up to $1,200 for individuals or $2,400 for married couples and up to $500 for each qualifying child.

Eligible Social Security (including SSDI and SSI), Veterans Administration, and Railroad Retirement beneficiaries who don’t normally file taxes will automatically receive payments of $1,200.

Any of these beneficiaries who have qualifying children under age 17 and did not file 2018 or 2019 taxes must use the Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info tool on IRS.gov to claim the $500 payment per child.

Full article at ACL

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Older adults who live in nursing homes or long-term care (LTC) facilities are at the greatest direct risk of contracting the new coronavirus and having severe symptoms. To combat this threat, LTCs have enforced extreme social distancing measures, such as banning visitors and eliminating group recreational activities and congregate dining.

Unfortunately, those measures may also reduce social support for these older adults, which could trigger a large-scale mental health crisis in LTC. Fortunately, psychologists are considered “essential providers” and can continue to provide services to LTC residents.

Although psychologists, as essential healthcare workers, may continue to provide onsite services, for many reasons, in-person services may not be an option during the COVID-19 crisis. In these situations, telehealth is a viable service delivery modality to support LTC residents and maintain continuity of care.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is allowing psychologists to offer telehealth services directly to LTC residents using common and easy-to-use videoconferencing platforms (such as Zoom Video, Skype and Facetime), via the client’s own computer or smartphone or a facility-provided device.

Full article at American Psychological Association

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

During the month of April the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA) is making available one free downloadable webinar every week. 

Here are the webinars they are offering:

  • Vestibular Issues after Brain Injury use code: WEBWEDSBO20
  • Protecting Vulnerable Populations from Exploitation use code: WEBWEDBOB20
  • Overcoming the Challenges of Aging use code: WEBWEDSTR20

After adding the webinar of choosing to the basket, a payment page comes up for sending the code.

More information at ACL

Continuing Education CEUs for Nursing Home Administrators

The U.S. skilled nursing and senior housing and care community joins others in expressing its deepest concern about the unprecedented public health challenge facing older Americans and everyone impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Expert care for older Americans, including residents of skilled nursing and senior housing and care facilities, must be maintained by ensuring the safety and well-being of the frontline health care personnel who are working around the clock to provide care.

These dedicated men and women and their families are making extraordinary sacrifices in these difficult times to protect and serve the most vulnerable among us.

Full article at NIC

Online Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators