How to improve your memory: 8 techniques to try

Most people have occasional lapses in memory, such as forgetting a new acquaintance’s name or misplacing the car keys.

Most of the time, this is simply a sign that a person is a bit too busy or is preoccupied. On the other hand, having a consistently poor memory can be problematic for someone.

Many factors play a role in memory loss, including genetics, age, and medical conditions that affect the brain. There are also some manageable risk factors for memory loss, such as diet and lifestyle.

While not all memory loss is preventable, people may be able to take measures to protect the brain against cognitive decline as they age.

Full story at Medical News Today

LTC Properties Inks $38M Deal for Two Ignite Transitional Skilled Nursing Facilities

LTC Properties (NYSE: LTC) on Friday announced a $38 million pair of transactions that will see the real estate investment trust (REIT) strike up a new relationship with transitional-care operator Ignite Medical Resorts.

The two separate agreements consist of a $19.5 million deal to purchase a recently constructed 90-bed skilled nursing facility in the Kansas City market, and an $18.4 million land-and-development deal for a second 90-bed SNF set to open in the fall of 2020, LTC chief investment officer Clint Malin said during the company’s second-quarter earnings call.

The Niles, Ill.-based Ignite Medical Resorts, a chain with a focus on high-end transitional care properties, will serve as the operator for the two Missouri buildings, with Avenue Development handling the design and construction process for the new property.

Full story at Skilled Nursing News

Osteoporosis drugs may lower mortality risk by 34%

New research has found a correlation between taking osteoporosis drugs and a lower risk of premature mortality. However, many people ignore their doctor’s advice when it comes to taking medication for bone health, the investigators note.

Osteoporosis is an age related condition that renders bone frailer and more prone to fractures. While this condition is more common in women, it also affects many men too.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), osteoporosis of the femur neck or lumbar spine — the most widespread forms of osteoporosis — affect 24.5% of women and 5.1% of men who are 65 years of age or over in the United States.

Full story at Medical News Today

Veteran Benefits for Assisted Living

IF YOU SERVED THE United States of America as a member of the armed services, you may be entitled to certain benefits that could make some aspects of getting older a little easier. Namely, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers some funding programs that can help offset the cost of certain kinds of care later in life. For some people, this sort of benefit can be a real help when weighing how to pay for assisted living or other long-term care options.

“Veterans and their spouses have multiple financial benefits that can help cover the cost of assisted living,” says Rick Wigginton, senior vice president of sales at Brookdale Senior Living, a Tennessee-based company that has more an 1,000 senior living and retirement communities across the United States.

Wigginton says that Brookdale, like many other senior living companies, seeks to “help many veterans maximize these benefits, which in some cases can really reduce the cost of senior living.” Senior living options can get expensive. Every little bit that can help offset these sometimes-large costs is often a welcome relief for families.

Full story at US News

11 Decorating Tips for Assisted Living

Decorating can ease the transition into assisted living.

Helping someone move into an assisted living facility can be an emotionally fraught experience. Collaborating with loved ones to decorate their new living quarters in a way that helps protect their physical safety and boost their emotional outlook can assist them in their transition, says Julia Bailey, a senior associate and interior design project manager with Denver-based OZ Architecture. “Moving into assisted living often can feel like a loss of independence and privacy for your loved one, but thoughtful interior design can go a long way toward improving happiness and well-being for the resident, as well as improving overall functionality of the new living space,” Bailey says.

Here are 11 assisted living decorating tips that can improve safety and boost the mood of your loved one.

Full story at US News

Clinical trial reveals potential for treating larger strokes with thrombectomy

Building on research results published today in JAMA Neurology showing patients with larger ischemic strokes could benefit from endovascular thrombectomy, an international, multicenter Phase III clinical trial will be starting at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

The trial, called SELECT2 (Optimizing Patient Selection for Endovascular Treatment in Acute Ischemic Stroke), is a randomized, controlled, open-label, assessor-blinded trial assessing efficacy and safety of thrombectomy procedure in patients with larger ischemic stroke.

While multiple previous clinical trials showed that endovascular thrombectomy was safe and beneficial for patients with smaller areas of damage from an ischemic stroke, potential safety and benefits for larger strokes are still unknown.

Full story at Science Daily

Call it Mighty Mouse: Breakthrough leaps Alzheimer’s research hurdle

University of California, Irvine researchers have made it possible to learn how key human brain cells respond to Alzheimer’s, vaulting a major obstacle in the quest to understand and one day vanquish it. By developing a way for human brain immune cells known as microglia to grow and function in mice, scientists now have an unprecedented view of crucial mechanisms contributing to the disease.

The team, led by Mathew Blurton-Jones, associate professor of neurobiology & behavior, said the breakthrough also holds promise for investigating many other neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. The details of their study have just been published in the journal Neuron.

The scientists dedicated four years to devising the new rodent model, which is considered “chimeric.” The word, stemming from the mythical Greek monster Chimera that was part goat, lion and serpent, describes an organism containing at least two different sets of DNA.

Full story at Science Daily

Older Parents May Have Better Behaved Kids

Many people wait until they’re older to have children, and that decision can raise the risk of problems like infertility and genetic abnormalities. But new research suggests there may be at least one benefit to having children later in life.

The study found that kids with at least one older parent were less likely to be defiant rule-breakers or physically aggressive.

“Older parents-to-be may be reassured that their age is not necessarily a negative factor with respect to behavioral problems in their child,” said study author Marielle Zondervan-Zwijnenburg. She’s a post-doctoral researcher at Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

Full story at US News

Can scientists find the formula for ‘better aging?’

Some researchers hope to find the secret of keeping old age at bay and enjoying eternal youth instead. However, a team of scientists from Southern California is looking for a different “recipe” — that of better aging.

“To drink from the fountain of youth, you have to figure out where the fountain of youth is and understand what the fountain of youth is doing,” says Nick Graham, who is an assistant professor in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science at the University of Southern California (USC) Viterbi School of Engineering in Los Angeles.

However, this is not what Graham and his colleague from USC are trying to achieve. As Graham himself notes: “We’re doing the opposite; we’re trying to study the reasons cells age so that we might be able to design treatments for better aging.”

Full story at Medical News Today

‘Failure to Launch’: Poll Finds Many Older Teens Still Too Reliant on Parents

Sarah Clark was happy to get the call from her college teen, but couldn’t believe what she was hearing.

“My kid called from college and said, ‘I’m sick, what should I do?'” Clark said. “I’m like, what do you mean what do you do? You have a drug store down the street. Go have at it.”

A new poll co-directed by Clark found that there are a lot of parents in the same boat.

Most parents think they are doing enough to prepare their teens for adulthood, but they’re wincing a bit as the time comes for their young to leave the nest, the survey reports.

Full story at US News