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Losing a spouse can be a heartbreaker, and new research suggests it’s also tough on the brain.

The study found that when a husband or wife dies, the surviving mate’s mental acuity could start to decline.

In fact, people who are widowed and have high levels of beta-amyloid plaque, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, appear to experience cognitive decline three times faster than similar people who have not lost a spouse, the researchers added.

Full article at WebMD

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Jose Romano, Chief of the Stroke Division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, co-authored a recently published international study that shows that visual rehabilitation is effective for patients who have suffered vision loss related to stroke or traumatic brain injury.

The study titled “Efficacy and predictors of Recovery of Function After Eye Movement Training in 296 Hemianopic Patients,” was recently published in the journal Cortex. It is the largest neuro-visual study of its kind.

The research team found that the NeuroEyeCoach visual rehabilitation therapy applied after stroke or other traumatic brain injury (TBI) improved vision in over 80 percent of patients, helping them with everyday tasks and improving their quality of life. The results showed that the treatment improved vision even in an 90-year-old patients.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month is just around the corner! Throughout the month of March, we hope you will join us in celebrating the many ways in which people with and without disabilities come together to form strong, diverse communities.

Each year, the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities partners with the Association for University Centers on Disabilities and the National Disabilities Rights Network on a DD Awareness Month social media campaign. The campaign seeks to raise awareness about the inclusion of people with developmental disabilities in all areas of community life and the barriers that people with disabilities still sometimes face in connecting to the communities in which they live.

Full article at the Administration for Community Living

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

New research confirms that the lower 0.25mg/kg dose of the clot-busting agent tenecteplase is appropriate for eligible stroke patients and can reduce the need for mechanical clot removal, according to late breaking science presented today at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020. The conference, Feb. 19-21 in Los Angeles, is a world premier meeting for researchers and clinicians dedicated to the science of stroke and brain health.

The clot-busting medication alteplase was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 25 years ago for treating clot-caused stroke (ischemic stroke) within 3 hours of symptom onset and AHA guidelines recommend alteplase up to 4.5 hours after stroke onset. Alteplase is administered as an IV drip over an hour. Alternatively, tenecteplase, a genetically modified variant of alteplase, is more convenient because it is administered as a single injection directly into the vein and restored blood flow to the brain better than alteplase in a previous trial. Two different doses of tenecteplase have been used in previous trials, and AHA guidelines include recommendations for both doses. Tenecteplase use for ischemic stroke is currently not approved by the FDA.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

New University of Kentucky research shows that the immune system may target other remote areas of the brain to improve recovery after a stroke.

The study in mice, published in PNAS by researchers from UK’s College of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and University of Pennsylvania reveals that after a stroke, B cells migrate to remote regions of the brain that are known to generate new neuronal cells as well as regulate cognitive and motor functions.

B cells are a type of white blood cell that makes antibodies. Less known and studied, however, is that B cells can produce neurotrophins that regulate the development and growth of neurons in the brain.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

The so-called Mediterranean diet is already considered one of the healthiest for your heart, and now scientists say it may give your gut bacteria a boost, too.

The diet is typically high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, olive oil and fish, and low in red meat and saturated fats. The new study finds that older adults who eat a Mediterranean diet tend to have more types of gut bacteria linked with healthy aging.

One nutritionist wasn’t surprised, and believes that the diet’s reliance on vegetables could be key to the effect.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

The most recent guidelines for primary prevention recommend aspirin use for individuals ages 40 to 70 years who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at increasingly higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. There has been considerable confusion from recently reported results of three large-scale randomized trials of aspirin in high risk primary prevention subjects, one of which showed a significant result, but the other two, based possibly on poor adherence and follow up, did not. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

In a commentary published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Medicine, researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine and collaborators from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, and the Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, provide guidance to health care providers and their patients. They urge that to do the most good for the most patients in primary care, health care providers should make individual clinical judgements about prescribing aspirin on a case-by-case basis.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Back in January, ACL sent out a draft of the March activities for Nutrition Month. We asked for comments and feedback from stakeholders and ACL Regions. Based on the feedback we received, we decided to adjust the focus of our celebration. We have been advised the that the phrase, “National Nutrition Month” is a trademarked one. So during March, we will now celebrate the “OAA National Senior Nutrition Program”* instead.  This program began in March of 1972, and has a rich and vibrant history across the Nation.

Going forward, March activities surrounding the topic of nutrition will be focused on Celebrating the National Senior Nutrition Program. This change will bring more awareness to older adult nutrition programs and the Older Adults Act. Activities will relate our nutrition network needs. This year’s theme and line up of activities will remain the same. We ask that you change the focus from “National Nutrition Month” to “Celebrating the National Senior Nutrition Program” – Please ensure all press releases, webinars, promotional fliers, etc. are corrected. ACL will be sending out promotional items throughout the month that you can use.

Full article at ACL

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Stroke survivors with high levels of optimism had lower inflammation levels, reduced stroke severity and less physical disability after three months, compared to those who are less optimistic, according to preliminary research presented at the Nursing Symposium of the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020 — Feb. 18-21 in Los Angeles.

In a small study of 49 stroke survivors, researchers examined the relationship among optimism, inflammation, stroke severity and physical disability for three months after a stroke. Researchers said that understanding how these elements relate to or impact one another may provide a scientific framework to develop new strategies for stroke recovery.

“Our results suggest that optimistic people have a better disease outcome, thus boosting morale may be an ideal way to improve mental health and recovery after a stroke,” said Yun-Ju Lai, Ph.D., M.S., R.N., the study’s first author and a postdoctoral fellow in the neurology department at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Full article at Science Daily

Assisted Living Administrator Continuing Education

A large fraction of Americans nearing retirement age are worried they can’t afford health insurance now, much less when they quit working to enjoy the good life, a new survey shows.

One in every four people between 50 and 64 are not confident they’ll be able to afford health insurance during the next year, and nearly half worry they won’t be able to afford coverage once they retire, researchers report.

“That number was a lot higher than I thought it would be,” said study author Dr. Renuka Tipirneni, an assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators