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A new study finds that 1 in 5 people under age 40 now have metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the odds for many serious conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The rate of metabolic syndrome is rising in all age groups — as many as half of adults over 60 have it. But among 20- to 39-year-olds, the rate rose 5 percentage points over five years, the study reported.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of heart disease risk factors that occur together. They include:

  • A large waistline,
  • High blood pressure,
  • Higher-than-normal blood sugar levels,
  • High triglyceride levels (triglycerides are a type of blood fat),
  • Low levels of good (HDL) cholesterol.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

A 100-year-old Indiana woman who has lived through World War II, survived cancer and successfully battled her way back from a bout of pneumonia last year, learned earlier this month that she’s also a survivor of COVID-19.

Leora Martin of Elkhart found out a week before her birthday on June 13 that she had tested negative for the virus after being diagnosed with COVID-19 in April — one of 76 residents at her assisted living facility to be infected. She and her twin sister, Delora Bloomingdale, who lives in California, celebrated their birthdays as centenarians and Leora’s recovery while conversing through Zoom.

“It was sort of a relief,” Martin told The Elkhart Truth of her recovery. “You have to remember, I’ve been through cancer. I had to go to the hospital for five days with rods in my body –- that was not comfortable, but I survived. They didn’t think I would survive pneumonia last year either, but I did.”

Full article at AP News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

It often seems the older a person gets, the less they sleep, but new research suggests that inconsistent sleep patterns might predict a future diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers who studied 2,930 older men for more than a decade found that those with a particular sleep problem — called circadian rhythm disruptions — were three times more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. A central nervous system disorder, Parkinson’s affects balance and movement, and often causes tremors.

The study findings “can potentially help with the early detection of Parkinson’s in older adults,” said study lead author Yue Leng, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

State regulators say mismanagement at an assisted living facility in northeastern Wisconsin made a deadly coronavirus outbreak worse.

Forty-six people have been infected by COVID-19, including 10 residents who died, at Country Villa Assisted Living in Pulaski.

The Wisconsin Division of Quality Assurance determined the facility failed to adequately monitor residents with coronavirus symptoms and did not follow public health guidelines until it was too late, the Green Bay Press-Gazette reported.

The division ordered owner Chad Reader to submit a plan to correct the deficiencies and pay a fine of $7,600.

Reader said it’s been difficult to lose residents to a “terrible disease” and contended the facility moved quickly to adapt to changing state and federal health guidelines. The facility has now addressed the state’s concerns, he said.

Full article at AP News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Interventional radiologists participating in a collaborative house call model in rural Indiana helped reduce emergency department use by 77 percent and hospital readmissions by 50 percent for nearly 1,000 elderly homebound patients with chronic illnesses, according to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 13. The novel care model brings interventional radiology treatments into patients’ homes to provide more value through in-home advanced specialty care, prevent common complications of chronic diseases, and avoid unnecessary emergency department visits and hospital admissions.

“Older homebound patients, including those in nursing home settings, have few resources available to receive specialty care and often delay care until preventable issues become urgent and acute,” said Nazar Golewale, MD, lead author of the study and an interventional radiologist with Modern Vascular & Vein Center in Valparaiso, Indiana and the northwest Indiana area. “By providing image-guided treatments in a patient’s home, we are improving access to care that otherwise would need to be delivered in the hospital.”

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Gov. Ned Lamont on Monday ordered an independent, third-party review of how Connecticut’s nursing homes and assisted living centers prepared for and responded to the coronavirus pandemic, noting the findings could be helpful if the state faces a second wave this fall.

The Democrat said proposals will soon be solicited from third-party experts. In the meantime, he expects to meet with state lawmakers to determine the full scope of the review, which will include input from the operators of the long-term care facilities, unions representing the workers, patients, health experts and others.

“Obviously that was the tragic center for our state and the other 49 states, in terms of fatalities,” said Lamont, referring to the nursing homes. “If there’s a chance that there could be a second surge later on this summer, more likely in the fall, we want to be ready.”

Full article at AP News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

A study by University of Cincinnati researchers and four Italian institutions reviewing neuroimaging and neurological symptoms in patients with COVID-19 may shed light on the virus’s impact on the central nervous system.

The findings, published in the journal Radiology, reveal that altered mental status and stroke are the most common neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients, which authors say could help physicians notice “red flags” earlier.

“Studies have described the spectrum of chest imaging features of COVID-19, but only a few case reports have described COVID-19 associated neuroimaging findings,” says lead author Abdelkader Mahammedi, MD, assistant professor of radiology at UC and a UC Health neuroradiologist. “To date, this is the largest and first study in literature that characterizes the neurological symptoms and neuroimaging features in COVID-19 patients. These newly discovered patterns could help doctors better and sooner recognize associations with COVID-19 and possibly provide earlier interventions.”

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Today marks the start of Older Americans Month. While we cannot celebrate it as usual, we still encourage individuals and communities to reflect on the countless contributions that older adults make to our lives and nation. This year’s theme, “Make Your Mark,” highlights the difference everyone can make – in the lives of older adults, in support of caregivers, and to strengthen communities.

Following are some materials available to help you observe Older Americans Month in our new “virtual” reality.

Full article at ACL

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Most older adults want to stay in their homes for as long as possible. Home maintenance is an important part of achieving this goal. Join the webinar to learn about Here to Stay: Home Upkeep for All™, a new AARP Foundation program sponsored by The Hartford. Here to Stay provides tools and advice to make preventive home maintenance easier and more cost-effective for older adults through interactive online tools and in-person workshops in select communities. Participants will learn ways to utilize Here to Stay resources to empower senior homeowners in their community to age more safely, cost-effectively, and confidently at home.
Presenter: Brenna McCallick, Program Manager, Housing, AARP Foundation

Register at Administration for Community Living

Living near major roads or highways is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), suggests new research published this week in the journal Environmental Health.

Researchers from the University of British Columbia analyzed data for 678,000 adults in Metro Vancouver. They found that living less than 50 metres from a major road or less than 150 metres from a highway is associated with a higher risk of developing dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and MS — likely due to increased exposure to air pollution.

The researchers also found that living near green spaces, like parks, has protective effects against developing these neurological disorders.

Full article at Science Daily