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A new study finds that 1 in 5 people under age 40 now have metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that together increase the odds for many serious conditions, including diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The rate of metabolic syndrome is rising in all age groups — as many as half of adults over 60 have it. But among 20- to 39-year-olds, the rate rose 5 percentage points over five years, the study reported.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of heart disease risk factors that occur together. They include:

  • A large waistline,
  • High blood pressure,
  • Higher-than-normal blood sugar levels,
  • High triglyceride levels (triglycerides are a type of blood fat),
  • Low levels of good (HDL) cholesterol.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

It often seems the older a person gets, the less they sleep, but new research suggests that inconsistent sleep patterns might predict a future diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers who studied 2,930 older men for more than a decade found that those with a particular sleep problem — called circadian rhythm disruptions — were three times more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. A central nervous system disorder, Parkinson’s affects balance and movement, and often causes tremors.

The study findings “can potentially help with the early detection of Parkinson’s in older adults,” said study lead author Yue Leng, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Kidney function declines naturally with age, even if a person is in good health, a new European study says.

Researchers assessed nearly 3,000 people in Norway, Germany and Iceland, age 50 and older, in order to learn more about how kidney function changes with age.

“What happens in our kidneys when we age is representative of all the other things that happen in our bodies. The kidney function deteriorates, not because we get ill, but as part of aging,” said lead author Bjørn Odvar Eriksen, leader of the Metabolic and Renal Research Group at the University of Tromsø (UiT)–The Arctic University of Norway.

Because loss of kidney function happens to everyone, Eriksen said it is an ideal way to determine aging in general.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Persistently engaging in negative thinking patterns may raise the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, finds a new UCL-led study.

In the study of people aged over 55, published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia, researchers found ‘repetitive negative thinking’ (RNT) is linked to subsequent cognitive decline as well as the deposition of harmful brain proteins linked to Alzheimer’s.

The researchers say RNT should now be further investigated as a potential risk factor for dementia, and psychological tools, such as mindfulness or meditation, should be studied to see if these could reduce dementia risk.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Gov. Ned Lamont on Monday ordered an independent, third-party review of how Connecticut’s nursing homes and assisted living centers prepared for and responded to the coronavirus pandemic, noting the findings could be helpful if the state faces a second wave this fall.

The Democrat said proposals will soon be solicited from third-party experts. In the meantime, he expects to meet with state lawmakers to determine the full scope of the review, which will include input from the operators of the long-term care facilities, unions representing the workers, patients, health experts and others.

“Obviously that was the tragic center for our state and the other 49 states, in terms of fatalities,” said Lamont, referring to the nursing homes. “If there’s a chance that there could be a second surge later on this summer, more likely in the fall, we want to be ready.”

Full article at AP News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Protecting nerve cells from losing their characteristic extensions, the dendrites, can reduce brain damage after a stroke. Neurobiologists from Heidelberg University have demonstrated this by means of research on a mouse model. The team, led by Prof. Dr Hilmar Bading in cooperation with Junior Professor Dr Daniela Mauceri, is investigating the protection of neuronal architecture to develop new approaches to treating neurodegenerative diseases. The current research findings were published in the journal “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.”

Brain nerve cells possess many arborised dendrites, which can make connections with other neurons. The highly complex, ramified structure of neurons is an important precondition for their ability to connect with other nerve cells, in order to enable the brain to function normally. In earlier studies, the Heidelberg researchers identified the signal molecule VEGFD — Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor D — as a central regulator for maintaining and restoring neuronal structures. “Our current research results demonstrate that a stroke as a consequence of an interruption of the blood supply to the brain leads to a reduction of VEGFD levels. That causes the nerve cells to lose part of their dendrites. They shrink and this leads to impairments of the cognitive and motor abilities,” explains Prof. Bading.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of the Secretary announces establishment of the National Advisory Committee on Children and Disasters (NACCD). See the notice published in the Federal Register.

The Advisory Committee will provide advice and consultation to the HHS Secretary on pediatric medical disaster planning, preparedness, response, and recovery with respect to the medical and public health needs of children in relation to disasters. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) will provide management and administrative oversight to support the activities of the Advisory Committee.

Full article at ACL

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Most older adults want to stay in their homes for as long as possible. Home maintenance is an important part of achieving this goal. Join the webinar to learn about Here to Stay: Home Upkeep for All™, a new AARP Foundation program sponsored by The Hartford. Here to Stay provides tools and advice to make preventive home maintenance easier and more cost-effective for older adults through interactive online tools and in-person workshops in select communities. Participants will learn ways to utilize Here to Stay resources to empower senior homeowners in their community to age more safely, cost-effectively, and confidently at home.
Presenter: Brenna McCallick, Program Manager, Housing, AARP Foundation

Register at Administration for Community Living

Living near major roads or highways is linked to higher incidence of dementia, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), suggests new research published this week in the journal Environmental Health.

Researchers from the University of British Columbia analyzed data for 678,000 adults in Metro Vancouver. They found that living less than 50 metres from a major road or less than 150 metres from a highway is associated with a higher risk of developing dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and MS — likely due to increased exposure to air pollution.

The researchers also found that living near green spaces, like parks, has protective effects against developing these neurological disorders.

Full article at Science Daily

If you want to slow down the aging process, it might not hurt to replace whole milk with skim, new research suggests.

The study of over 5,800 U.S. adults found that those who regularly indulged in higher-fat milk had shorter telomeres in their cells — a sign of accelerated “biological aging.”

The findings do not prove that milk fat, per se, hastens aging, stressed researcher Larry Tucker, a professor of exercise sciences at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.

But the study does lend support to what U.S. dietary guidelines suggest for adults: If you’re going to drink cow’s milk, opt for low-fat or skim, Tucker said.

Full article at US News