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Back in January, ACL sent out a draft of the March activities for Nutrition Month. We asked for comments and feedback from stakeholders and ACL Regions. Based on the feedback we received, we decided to adjust the focus of our celebration. We have been advised the that the phrase, “National Nutrition Month” is a trademarked one. So during March, we will now celebrate the “OAA National Senior Nutrition Program”* instead.  This program began in March of 1972, and has a rich and vibrant history across the Nation.

Going forward, March activities surrounding the topic of nutrition will be focused on Celebrating the National Senior Nutrition Program. This change will bring more awareness to older adult nutrition programs and the Older Adults Act. Activities will relate our nutrition network needs. This year’s theme and line up of activities will remain the same. We ask that you change the focus from “National Nutrition Month” to “Celebrating the National Senior Nutrition Program” – Please ensure all press releases, webinars, promotional fliers, etc. are corrected. ACL will be sending out promotional items throughout the month that you can use.

Full article at ACL

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Stroke survivors with high levels of optimism had lower inflammation levels, reduced stroke severity and less physical disability after three months, compared to those who are less optimistic, according to preliminary research presented at the Nursing Symposium of the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020 — Feb. 18-21 in Los Angeles.

In a small study of 49 stroke survivors, researchers examined the relationship among optimism, inflammation, stroke severity and physical disability for three months after a stroke. Researchers said that understanding how these elements relate to or impact one another may provide a scientific framework to develop new strategies for stroke recovery.

“Our results suggest that optimistic people have a better disease outcome, thus boosting morale may be an ideal way to improve mental health and recovery after a stroke,” said Yun-Ju Lai, Ph.D., M.S., R.N., the study’s first author and a postdoctoral fellow in the neurology department at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

Full article at Science Daily

Assisted Living Administrator Continuing Education

A large fraction of Americans nearing retirement age are worried they can’t afford health insurance now, much less when they quit working to enjoy the good life, a new survey shows.

One in every four people between 50 and 64 are not confident they’ll be able to afford health insurance during the next year, and nearly half worry they won’t be able to afford coverage once they retire, researchers report.

“That number was a lot higher than I thought it would be,” said study author Dr. Renuka Tipirneni, an assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan.

Full article at US News

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Dementia is one of the most debilitating consequences of Parkinson’s disease, a progressive neurological condition characterized by tremors, stiffness, slow movement and impaired balance. Eighty percent of people with Parkinson’s develop dementia within 20 years of the diagnosis, and patients who carry a particular variant of the gene APOE are at especially high risk.

In new research, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a clue to the link between Parkinson’s, APOE and dementia. They discovered that harmful Parkinson’s proteins spread more rapidly through the brains of mice that have the high-risk variant of APOE, and that memory and thinking skills deteriorate faster in people with Parkinson’s who carry the variant. The findings, published Feb. 5 in Science Translational Medicine, could lead to therapies targeting APOE to slow or prevent cognitive decline in people with Parkinson’s.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

NMDARs (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors) serve as valves on nerve cells, controlling the flow of electrical signals in the brain. This special group of receptors is suspect in many neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, stroke, and Parkinson’s. Biologists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and chemists from the University of Bristol have joined forces, creating a chemical compound to enable more precise investigation of NMDAR activity.

In the latest issue of Nature Communications, CSHL Professor Hiro Furukawa and colleagues detailed how they identified and perfected a chemical compound that inhibits, or stops the activity of certain NMDARs. By inhibiting some NMDARs while letting others function, researchers can now identify the roles different types of NMDA receptors play in both healthy and diseased brains.

Jue Xiang Wang, a graduate of CSHL’s Ph.D. program who helped lead the research, explained that the CSHL-Bristol team investigated how the novel compound UBP791 targets a pair of NMDAR subunits called GluN2C and GluN2D.

Full article at Science Daily

Assisted Living Administrator Continuing Education

It’s a pain. About 80 percent of adults in the United States will experience lower back pain at some point. Treating back pain typically involves medication, including opioids, surgery, therapy and self-care options. Efforts to reduce opioid use and increase physically based therapies to reduce pain and increase physical function and safety are crucial.

Patients are often advised to use non-pharmacological treatments to manage lower back pain such as exercise and mind-body interventions. But, do they really help? In a review published in the journal Holistic Nursing Practice, researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s College for Design and Social Inquiry and Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing evaluated the evidence of effects of three movement-based mind-body interventions on chronic low back pain. They examined yoga, tai chi, which combines gentle physical exercise and stretching with mindfulness, and qigong, a traditional Chinese meditative movement therapy focused on body awareness and attention during slow, relaxed, and fluid repetitive body movements. Little is known about the effects of movement-based mind-body intervention, in particular qigong and tai chi.

Full article at Science Daily

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

Genesis HealthCare (NYSE: GEN) on Tuesday announced a set of deals that will see the skilled nursing giant transfer control of 19 facilities in the West to a regional operator — while also still serving as a provider of back-office support and ancillary services.

Under the terms of the $79 million transaction, the Los Angeles-based New Generation Health, LLC purchased the operations and real estate associated with six skilled nursing facilities.

New Generation also assumed full operational responsibility for 13 more properties — seven SNFs, five behavioral health centers, and one assisted living community — in California, Nevada, and Washington state.

Full article at Skilled Nursing News

Nursing home administrator continuing education courses

American dentists often prescribe more than the recommended supply of opioid painkillers to patients, a new study finds.

Not only that, they are more likely to prescribe more powerful opioids, the researchers found.

In this study, the researchers analyzed data on nearly 550,000 dental visits by adult patients between 2011 and 2015, before U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for pain management were issued in 2016.

Full article at Web MD

Continuing Education for Nursing Home Administrators

In collaboration with ACL, the Evidence-Based Program Review Council is surveying organizations that have implemented approved evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention programs that meet ACL’s OAA Title III-D criteria.

As part of a re-review of all programs on the current Title III-D approved list, this survey aims to gauge satisfaction with these evidence-based programs:

  • Active Choices
  • Active Living Every Day (ALED)
  • AEA Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Program (AFAP)
  • AEA Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program (AFEP)
  • Better Choices, Better Health (online Chronic Disease Self-Management Program)
  • Care Transitions Intervention (CTI)
  • EnhanceWellness

Full article at Administration for Community Living

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